Culloden Battlefield: memorialisation and re-memorialisation

On St Andrew’s Day Remember Me Researcher, Dr Yvonne Inall reports on a recent visit to Culloden Battlefield and layered memorialisation processes at the site. On the 16th of April 1746 Jacobite and Government forces met in battle on Culloden Moor near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The fighting was brutal and intense – the…

Stop the presses! Research highlights now available online.

Remember Me Principal Investigator, Emeritus Professor Margaret Holloway heralds the online publication of our first research highlight documents. It’s hard to believe but the ‘Remember Me’ project is well into its final year. The period since my last update has seen all project streams actively engaged in data analysis and report drafting and I am…

Mortimer 100: memorialisation through collecting

As part of the 2017 Festival of Archaeology guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum explores the concept of collections as a form of memorial. Individuals can be memorialised and remembered in a variety of ways.  When we think of memorialisation in the UK, our thoughts usually focus on…

Later Iron Age cremations: interregional practices, local peculiarities

During the Later Iron Age cremation was extremely popular. Guest-blogger Andy Lamb examines this practice. At certain times in European prehistory, new developments arose which were subsequently adopted and adapted across a wide area of the continent. One these was the decision to cremate the dead, which from the 3rd century BC became the preferred…

Remembrance through the use of human remains in archaeological collections

Guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum, explores human remains and remembrance in museum collections. Museums and collectors often do not discuss the human remains they care for.  This is due to the complex ethical debates surrounding the excavation, collection and storage of these remains.  In this post, we…

Coffin plates and monuments: comparing 19th century funerary items

During the 19th century inscriptions were used both within the grave and on above ground memorials. Guest-blogger Sarah Hoile, PhD candidate at UCL Institute of Archaeology, is examining the ways these different media were used. On June 18th 1828, John Cotton died in Devonshire Place in Marylebone, London, near Regent’s Park [1]. His body was…

Dining with the Dead in Dublin

Remember Me Researcher Dr Yvonne Inall reports on heritage and memorialisation in a Dublin restaurant. When you work on a project which is strongly focussed on remembrance and memorialisation you begin to see memorials everywhere you go. It’s surprising how embedded and omnipresent memorialisation is in our daily lives. On a recent holiday in Dublin…

Remembering Bog Bodies on World Wetlands Day 2017

On World Wetlands Day Remember Me Co-Investigator, Professor Malcolm Lillie explores the relationship between wetlands and remembrance of the dead. Wetlands are not, perhaps, the most obvious places with which to associate remembrance of the dead. However, throughout human history wetlands have been, and continue to be, places which people are drawn to for a…

Death and Culture 2016 – Conference Report

Remember Me researchers recently presented our research at the Death and Culture 2016 conference and they report on the experience. Remember Me project researchers recently attended and presented some of their research at the Death and Culture Conference at the University of York The international conference, which ran over three days from 1-3 September 2016…