Coffin plates and monuments: comparing 19th century funerary items

During the 19th century inscriptions were used both within the grave and on above ground memorials. Guest-blogger Sarah Hoile, PhD candidate at UCL Institute of Archaeology, is examining the ways these different media were used. On June 18th 1828, John Cotton died in Devonshire Place in Marylebone, London, near Regent’s Park [1]. His body was…

In Search of the Somme

Remember Me Co-Investigator and photographer Associate Professor Liz Nicol takes us on a personal journey behind the lens. As a new project unfolds, where do you begin? Especially when you have vigorously avoided anything remotely connected the subject, and in this case the subject is World War One. This blog is a reflection of the…

Hull Remembers: Edward Booth Headstone Restored

Guest-blogger John Scotney reports on the work undertaken by the Friends of Hull General Cemetery, a small community group, to restore a local memorial to the victim of a tragic train crash, which spurred rail safety measures. At 11.30 on Saturday 11th February 2017, a damp and dismal day, a small group of members of…

Aberfan: Remembering a National Disaster 50 Years On.

Remember Me Co-Investigator Professor Malcolm Lillie offers a very personal reflection on the ongoing pain and remembrance of a national disaster. I was three and a half years old growing up in a small housing estate to the east of Newport in South Wales when the Aberfan disaster shook Wales to its core.  Like Aberfan…

Death and Culture 2016 – Conference Report

Remember Me researchers recently presented our research at the Death and Culture 2016 conference and they report on the experience. Remember Me project researchers recently attended and presented some of their research at the Death and Culture Conference at the University of York The international conference, which ran over three days from 1-3 September 2016…

The ‘speared corpse’ burials of Iron Age East Yorkshire.

Remember Me researcher Dr Yvonne Inall, who is working on our Deep Time study explores a rare Iron Age burial ritual, unique to East Yorkshire. In the summer of 2015 I received an incredible invitation, one of those not to be refused. Archaeologists from MAP Archaeology Ltd. working at Pocklington, in rural East Yorkshire found…

Memorialising cremated loved ones – the case of Yorkshire

In this latest Remember Me blog, Co-Investigator Dr Nicholas J. Evans, explores the impact the UK’s first municipal crematoria had upon the changing face of memorialisation in Northern Britain. January 1901 did not just herald the demise of Britain’s then longest serving monarch, Queen Victoria, it also signalled the end of the Victorian celebration of…

Otago Migrant Gravestone Study

Tiffany Jenks, Kirstie Smitheram, Peita Ferens-Green, and Sargam Goundar, students at the University of Otago in New Zealand, look at the memorialisation of migrants in the Southern Cemetery in Dunedin.* Introduction ‘Peopling New Zealand: Migration, Race and Ethnicity’, a fourth year History paper co-ordinated by Professor Angela McCarthy, Remember Me project research consultant, based at…

Memorialising James Taylor, ‘Father of the Ceylon Tea Enterprise’

Angela McCarthy, Professor of Scottish and Irish History at the University of Otago, looks at the memorialisation of James Taylor, ‘father of the Ceylon tea enterprise’, ahead of the 150th anniversary of Ceylon tea in 2017. Scotsman James Taylor is renowned in Sri Lanka (formerly Ceylon) as the ‘father of the Ceylon tea enterprise’ because…

Memorialisation in the Scottish Jewish Context

Guest blogger Harvey L Kaplan, Director of the Scottish Jewish Archives Centre reports on Jewish memorials in Scotland. The Scottish Jewish Archives Centre (SJAC) aims to document and illustrate the Jewish experience in Scotland since the 18th century, collecting and preserving the records and looking at religious, organisational, social, economic, political, cultural and family life,…