A summer internship with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Guest-blogger, Jack Sibley shares his experience as a Centenary Intern with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. This summer I had the fantastic opportunity to move to France for three months in order take part in a new internship programme run by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Living in Arras, the site of a major British…

‘Regards from Hull’ – The texture of remembrance at home and abroad

This Remembrance Day weekend Remember Me Co-Investigator, Dr Nick Evans explores the varied texture of memory and the diversity of the forgotten. On Sunday at 11am Britons at home and in certain parts of the Commonwealth stand to pay homage to the millions of men, women and increasingly animals, who died during the First World…

Making Memorials: behind the scenes at a memorial masons workshop

Remember Me researchers Dr Nick Evans and Dr Yvonne Inall had an opportunity to join a tour of a memorial masons workshop in Hull as part of Heritage Open Days 2017. Stone memorials remain as enduring markers to the departed around the world. Seen as an everlasting memorial, the decisions about what kind of stone,…

Later Iron Age cremations: interregional practices, local peculiarities

During the Later Iron Age cremation was extremely popular. Guest-blogger Andy Lamb examines this practice. At certain times in European prehistory, new developments arose which were subsequently adopted and adapted across a wide area of the continent. One these was the decision to cremate the dead, which from the 3rd century BC became the preferred…

Red Army Soldiers’ Cemetery in Bielsko-Biała, Poland

Remember Me Research Affiliate, Dr Marcin Biernat, shares some photographs of the Red Army Cemetery in Bielsko-Biała, Poland. A few days ago I visited the cemetery of Red Army Soldiers in Bielsko-Biała, my hometown. I took a long walk around in the morning and I want to share some photos. The Soviet invasion of Poland…

Coffin plates and monuments: comparing 19th century funerary items

During the 19th century inscriptions were used both within the grave and on above ground memorials. Guest-blogger Sarah Hoile, PhD candidate at UCL Institute of Archaeology, is examining the ways these different media were used. On June 18th 1828, John Cotton died in Devonshire Place in Marylebone, London, near Regent’s Park [1]. His body was…

In Search of the Somme

Remember Me Co-Investigator and photographer Associate Professor Liz Nicol takes us on a personal journey behind the lens. As a new project unfolds, where do you begin? Especially when you have vigorously avoided anything remotely connected the subject, and in this case the subject is World War One. This blog is a reflection of the…

Hull Remembers: Edward Booth Headstone Restored

Guest-blogger John Scotney reports on the work undertaken by the Friends of Hull General Cemetery, a small community group, to restore a local memorial to the victim of a tragic train crash, which spurred rail safety measures. At 11.30 on Saturday 11th February 2017, a damp and dismal day, a small group of members of…

Aberfan: Remembering a National Disaster 50 Years On.

Remember Me Co-Investigator Professor Malcolm Lillie offers a very personal reflection on the ongoing pain and remembrance of a national disaster. I was three and a half years old growing up in a small housing estate to the east of Newport in South Wales when the Aberfan disaster shook Wales to its core.  Like Aberfan…