Remembrance through the use of human remains in archaeological collections

Guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum, explores human remains and remembrance in museum collections. Museums and collectors often do not discuss the human remains they care for.  This is due to the complex ethical debates surrounding the excavation, collection and storage of these remains.  In this post, we…

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

Remember Me Research Fellow, Dr Louis Bailey highlights the importance of recognising and confronting discrimination Today (May 17th) marks the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia.  The day raises awareness of the ongoing stigma and discrimination that is directed towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex people worldwide, and to highlight the urgent need…

Coffin plates and monuments: comparing 19th century funerary items

During the 19th century inscriptions were used both within the grave and on above ground memorials. Guest-blogger Sarah Hoile, PhD candidate at UCL Institute of Archaeology, is examining the ways these different media were used. On June 18th 1828, John Cotton died in Devonshire Place in Marylebone, London, near Regent’s Park [1]. His body was…

Gordon must fall? The ‘Martyr General’ and Brexit Britain

Guest-blogger James Selway reflects on what the legacy of General Charles Gordon means to him in light of the recent decision by Britain to leave the European Union. If 2016 was a year of political revolt in Britain, 2017 has kick-started a process of reflection across our disunited Kingdom. Critics have labelled Brexit ‘Empire 2.0’,…

The Triumph of the Human Spirit: The Italian Chapel, Orkney

“The chapel is yours to love and preserve” – Signor Chiocchetti (Artist and Italian Prisoner of War, Orkney) Remember Me Researcher, Dr Louis Bailey reports on a unique legacy of World War Two in Orkney. A cold, windswept November morning in 2016 finds me driving over Scapa Flow in Orkney to the site of the…

Why Wear Rosemary on ANZAC Day?

Remember Me Researcher Dr Yvonne Inall explores the reasons underlying the tradition of wearing sprigs of rosemary on Anzac Day. Last year, guest-blogger Dr Jenny McLeod explored the origins of ANZAC Day . This year I want to focus on one of the smaller details of ANZAC Day remembrance activities: the wearing of rosemary. Each…

In Search of the Somme

Remember Me Co-Investigator and photographer Associate Professor Liz Nicol takes us on a personal journey behind the lens. As a new project unfolds, where do you begin? Especially when you have vigorously avoided anything remotely connected the subject, and in this case the subject is World War One. This blog is a reflection of the…

Dining with the Dead in Dublin

Remember Me Researcher Dr Yvonne Inall reports on heritage and memorialisation in a Dublin restaurant. When you work on a project which is strongly focussed on remembrance and memorialisation you begin to see memorials everywhere you go. It’s surprising how embedded and omnipresent memorialisation is in our daily lives. On a recent holiday in Dublin…

Dr Mary Murdoch (1864-1916): ‘A Woman Doctor of Hull’

Guest-blogger Professor Katharine Cockin shares the history of Dr Mary Murdoch, the first woman ever to practise medicine in Hull. The First World War centenary has exposed some hidden stories about wartime Hull. As a port city located along a very distinctive estuary, Hull has been vulnerable to aerial bombardment. From 1915 onwards the monstrous…

Hull Remembers: Edward Booth Headstone Restored

Guest-blogger John Scotney reports on the work undertaken by the Friends of Hull General Cemetery, a small community group, to restore a local memorial to the victim of a tragic train crash, which spurred rail safety measures. At 11.30 on Saturday 11th February 2017, a damp and dismal day, a small group of members of…