The changing face of war memorialisation. Boer War memorials in Hull and Manchester.

Guest-blogger, Megan Howarth, explores the impact of ‘total war’ on memorialisation practices following the Second Boer War. A decade before the First World War permanently changed the way Britain remembered those killed at war, the aftermath of the Second Boer War, the twentieth century’s first ‘Total War’, necessitated the creation of memorials in towns and…

The Bear River Massacre: The West’s Forgotten Past

On the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, guest-blogger Dr Susannah Hopson draws attention to the complex memorial processes associated with the Bear River Massacre. On a warm, bright October day in 2014, I visited the remote town of Franklin, Southeastern Idaho in the United States. An area not usually visited by tourists, this…

Remembering Dunkirk

Remember Me Researcher, Dr Yvonne Inall, explores the ways in which the massive evacuation of troops during Operation Dynamo has been memorialised. The release of the new Christopher Nolan film Dunkirk has prompted me to ask the question: how has Dunkirk been memorialised? On 10 May 1940 Germany invaded Belgium and the Netherlands as a…

Remembering Donated Bodies: The Hidden Face of Memorialisation

Guest-blogger Zivarna Murphy offers a glimpse into the process of memorialising those who have gifted their bodies to medical research. When thinking about the changing face of memorialisation in Britain and the increasing emphasis on the individual as the Remember Me Project puts forward, I can’t help but question this when it comes to memorialising…

Mortimer 100: memorialisation through collecting

As part of the 2017 Festival of Archaeology guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum explores the concept of collections as a form of memorial. Individuals can be memorialised and remembered in a variety of ways.  When we think of memorialisation in the UK, our thoughts usually focus on…

Remembrance through the use of human remains in archaeological collections

Guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum, explores human remains and remembrance in museum collections. Museums and collectors often do not discuss the human remains they care for.  This is due to the complex ethical debates surrounding the excavation, collection and storage of these remains.  In this post, we…

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

Remember Me Research Fellow, Dr Louis Bailey highlights the importance of recognising and confronting discrimination Today (May 17th) marks the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia.  The day raises awareness of the ongoing stigma and discrimination that is directed towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex people worldwide, and to highlight the urgent need…

Coffin plates and monuments: comparing 19th century funerary items

During the 19th century inscriptions were used both within the grave and on above ground memorials. Guest-blogger Sarah Hoile, PhD candidate at UCL Institute of Archaeology, is examining the ways these different media were used. On June 18th 1828, John Cotton died in Devonshire Place in Marylebone, London, near Regent’s Park [1]. His body was…

Gordon must fall? The ‘Martyr General’ and Brexit Britain

Guest-blogger James Selway reflects on what the legacy of General Charles Gordon means to him in light of the recent decision by Britain to leave the European Union. If 2016 was a year of political revolt in Britain, 2017 has kick-started a process of reflection across our disunited Kingdom. Critics have labelled Brexit ‘Empire 2.0’,…