Remembering Mining Disasters

As part of our Conference Showcase Series, guest-blogger PhD candidate Ann-Marie Foster explores the ways in which mining disasters have been memorialised. “Digging the rock where Death reputes Peace lies indeed” – Wilfred Owen  ‘Miners’ The late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries saw the worst mining disasters that the UK has ever witnessed. The Hartley…

The heart has a memory

As part of a Remember Me Conference Showcase Series, guest-blogger, Jasmine Brammer, from Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust in Melbourne, Australia, shares a deeply personal account of the importance of cemetery visits as acts of Remembrance. As someone facing a year of moments without my mother, I’m increasingly aware of the giant space that’s opened where…

What happens to the homeless when they die?

As the winter chill bites and the number of homeless in Britain has risen for seven consecutive years, Remember Me researcher, Dr Yvonne Inall, asks what becomes of those who die in a state of homelessness. The number of homeless people in Britain has been on the increase for the past seven years. Crisis UK…

A summer internship with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Guest-blogger, Jack Sibley shares his experience as a Centenary Intern with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. This summer I had the fantastic opportunity to move to France for three months in order take part in a new internship programme run by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Living in Arras, the site of a major British…

Flowers from Freetown

In Freetown Week guest-blogger Gladys Cole shares her experience of creating memorial wreaths for loved ones. Flowers for us Sierra Leoneans are a symbol of love,  hope and sympathy.  We remember our loved ones who have died and honour them by arranging beautiful natural flowers wreaths to lay on their  graves. This is done on…

Remembering Bertha Von Suttner on the International Day of Peace

Guest blogger Lee Karen Stow highlights the legacy of Bertha Von Suttner, the first woman awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Prayers and messages of peace hang from the branches of The Peace Tree at The Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, home to the International Court of Justice and the Permanent Court of Arbitration. I…

How ‘trinkets’ become family heirlooms.

Guest-blogger, Jasmine Brammer, from Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust in Melbourne, Australia explores the process by which personal objects associated with deceased loved ones become heirlooms. When a loved one dies, their possessions don’t have to be antiques or expensive heirlooms, or itemised in a Will or Trust to gain the title of ‘treasure’. This can…

Remembrance through the use of human remains in archaeological collections

Guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum, explores human remains and remembrance in museum collections. Museums and collectors often do not discuss the human remains they care for.  This is due to the complex ethical debates surrounding the excavation, collection and storage of these remains.  In this post, we…

Why Wear Rosemary on ANZAC Day?

Remember Me Researcher Dr Yvonne Inall explores the reasons underlying the tradition of wearing sprigs of rosemary on Anzac Day. Last year, guest-blogger Dr Jenny MacLeod explored the origins of ANZAC Day . This year I want to focus on one of the smaller details of ANZAC Day remembrance activities: the wearing of rosemary. Each…

Dr Mary Murdoch (1864-1916): ‘A Woman Doctor of Hull’

Guest-blogger Professor Katharine Cockin shares the history of Dr Mary Murdoch, the first woman ever to practise medicine in Hull. The First World War centenary has exposed some hidden stories about wartime Hull. As a port city located along a very distinctive estuary, Hull has been vulnerable to aerial bombardment. From 1915 onwards the monstrous…