From No Grave to a Pew

Guest-blogger, Sonja Boehmer-Christiansen shares a very personal story of her father’s life, death and memorialisation: from Zwickau to Hull via Dresden, Eckernförde, and La Rochelle and his death near Kaliningrad. My father was born in 1914 but his wealthy parents went bankrupt twice after WW1. As a teenager he therefore assisted in the family bakery and…

Commemorating White Armband Day Transnationally and in Virtual Spaces

Our Conference Showcase Series continues. Guest blogger Johanna Paul writes about the emergence of White Armband Day (Dan Bijelih Traka), a commemoration day related to the war crimes committed in Prijedor during the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina (1992-1995). Prijedor is notorious for ethnic cleansing, concentrations camps and displacement in the early days of the war in…

Remembering the Welsh Women who Spoke Out to America

This International Women’s Day guest-blogger, Dr Lee Karen Stow, shares a tale of Welsh Women peace activists. Ahead of this week’s International Women’s Day, I head to Snowdonia in North Wales (snow permitted) for an event to remember and commemorate thousands of Welsh women who joined together in a ‘social revolution for peace’. In 1923…

Joy of flight. Remembering Joy Lofthouse (1923-2017).

Guest-blogger, Lee Karen Stow shares her memories of meeting Joy Lofthouse, former ATA pilot, who recently passed away. In 2012 I had the privilege of meeting, interviewing and photographing Joy Lofthouse, at the time one of the few surviving female pilots of the Second World War. The interview was part of the long-term documentary project…

Culloden Battlefield: memorialisation and re-memorialisation

On St Andrew’s Day Remember Me Researcher, Dr Yvonne Inall reports on a recent visit to Culloden Battlefield and layered memorialisation processes at the site. On the 16th of April 1746 Jacobite and Government forces met in battle on Culloden Moor near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. The fighting was brutal and intense – the…

A summer internship with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Guest-blogger, Jack Sibley shares his experience as a Centenary Intern with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. This summer I had the fantastic opportunity to move to France for three months in order take part in a new internship programme run by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Living in Arras, the site of a major British…

‘Regards from Hull’ – The texture of remembrance at home and abroad

This Remembrance Day weekend Remember Me Co-Investigator, Dr Nick Evans explores the varied texture of memory and the diversity of the forgotten. On Sunday at 11am Britons at home and in certain parts of the Commonwealth stand to pay homage to the millions of men, women and increasingly animals, who died during the First World…

Remembering Concepcion Picciotto, Anti-Nuclear Peace Activist

On the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons guest-blogger Lee Karen Stow shares her recollections of meeting and photographing life-long anti-nuclear campaigner Conception Picciotto. Concepcion Picciotto said she spent 35 years of her life outside the White House in Washington DC to “stop the world from being destroyed”. Living in the familiar…

The changing face of war memorialisation. Boer War memorials in Hull and Manchester.

Guest-blogger, Megan Howarth, explores the impact of ‘total war’ on memorialisation practices following the Second Boer War. A decade before the First World War permanently changed the way Britain remembered those killed at war, the aftermath of the Second Boer War, the twentieth century’s first ‘Total War’, necessitated the creation of memorials in towns and…

Remembering Dunkirk

Remember Me Researcher, Dr Yvonne Inall, explores the ways in which the massive evacuation of troops during Operation Dynamo has been memorialised. The release of the new Christopher Nolan film Dunkirk has prompted me to ask the question: how has Dunkirk been memorialised? On 10 May 1940 Germany invaded Belgium and the Netherlands as a…