Glasgow Necropolis: image and memory

Guest-blogger, artist and writer, Alan John Campbell, has developed a fascination with memorialisation. His work at Glasgow Necropolis has been compiled into a poignant photographic essay. The images compiled into this photographic essay each express a narrative that taken as a total will hopefully be interesting and meaningful. Examining these images suggests that one aspect…

A journey through time – “Better by bike than by train.”

Guest blogger, Evelyn Rose, shares the story of two motorcycle journeys, across two centuries, to promote tolerance, understanding and to push back against injustice. In the late 19th Century, Max Nordau, a Hungarian physician, author and social critic, accompanied by Theodore Herzyl, witnessed rowdy crowds in the streets of Paris spewing  “Sal Juif! Sal Juif!”…

From No Grave to a Pew

Guest-blogger, Sonja Boehmer-Christiansen shares a very personal story of her father’s life, death and memorialisation: from Zwickau to Hull via Dresden, Eckernförde, and La Rochelle and his death near Kaliningrad. My father was born in 1914 but his wealthy parents went bankrupt twice after WW1. As a teenager he therefore assisted in the family bakery and…

End Notes

Guest-blogger, Ray French, introduces a new book (which you can download for free) exploring ways of dealing with mourning and bereavement. Death is a frightening subject to contemplate alone, but when we share our fears and experiences of it that fear often breaks down. That was what we hoped to achieve when we held 3…

Free-writing Case Study Report Now Available

The final report on the Remember Me project’s research case study examining free-writing practices in palliative care is now available. In experiences of bereavement, people hold on to their loved ones, creating continuing bonds and ongoing relationships with the departed. Many hospices offer Memorial books through which these relationships can be expressed and maintained in…

The Watery Grave: Death at Sea on Voyages to New Zealand, 1840-80

In the latest contribution to our Conference Showcase Series, guest-blogger Associate Professor Lydon Fraser, explores the ways in which death at sea was managed on the long sea voyages to New Zealand during the Victorian era. David Carr, writing aboard the Lyttelton-bound Lancashire Witch in 1863, solemnly recorded ‘a morning of greate mortality’ on the…

Commemorating White Armband Day Transnationally and in Virtual Spaces

Our Conference Showcase Series continues. Guest blogger Johanna Paul writes about the emergence of White Armband Day (Dan Bijelih Traka), a commemoration day related to the war crimes committed in Prijedor during the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina (1992-1995). Prijedor is notorious for ethnic cleansing, concentrations camps and displacement in the early days of the war in…

Remember Me Memorial Trail

In association with the Remember Me Conference (4-7 April, 2018) we have developed a memorial walking trail around Hull City Centre, which you download and follow. Memorial Trail PDF Our trail document is a downloadable PDF in A3 format (which can also be legibly printed at A4 size). If you have a smartphone, you can…

Shaping Disaster Memorialisation through Media Coverage

As our Conference Showcase Series continues, guest blogger Professor Marina Brancato, explores the complex relationship between media reporting of disaster and memorialisation in the context of Italian earthquakes. An earthquake is a natural and cultural event and a particular moment in the history of a community because the ontological security of  human beings is brought…

Remembering and Memorializing Viola Desmond: The first Black woman to be featured on a Canadian banknote

As our Conference Showcase Series continues, guest-blogger Channon Oyeniran, Vice President, Ontario Black History Society explores the civil rights legacy behind and significance of Canada’s new $10 note. On December 8th, 2016, after receiving thousands of nominations from across Canada, it was announced that a woman would be the first in the country’s history, to be featured…

Remembering the Idealist, but not the Ideology?

As part of our Conference Showcase Series, guest blogger Ryan Nolan, PhD candidate at University College Dublin, examines the memorialisation of the Dublin 1913 Lock Out. From a sociological perspective, what societies ‘forget’ is equally as important as to what they remember. History is often in this sense is distorted or edited to suit the…