Remembering Donated Bodies: The Hidden Face of Memorialisation

Guest-blogger Zivarna Murphy offers a glimpse into the process of memorialising those who have gifted their bodies to medical research. When thinking about the changing face of memorialisation in Britain and the increasing emphasis on the individual as the Remember Me Project puts forward, I can’t help but question this when it comes to memorialising…

Mortimer 100: memorialisation through collecting

As part of the 2017 Festival of Archaeology guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum explores the concept of collections as a form of memorial. Individuals can be memorialised and remembered in a variety of ways.  When we think of memorialisation in the UK, our thoughts usually focus on…

Later Iron Age cremations: interregional practices, local peculiarities

During the Later Iron Age cremation was extremely popular. Guest-blogger Andy Lamb examines this practice. At certain times in European prehistory, new developments arose which were subsequently adopted and adapted across a wide area of the continent. One these was the decision to cremate the dead, which from the 3rd century BC became the preferred…

Red Army Soldiers’ Cemetery in Bielsko-Biała, Poland

Remember Me Research Affiliate, Dr Marcin Biernat, shares some photographs of the Red Army Cemetery in Bielsko-Biała, Poland. A few days ago I visited the cemetery of Red Army Soldiers in Bielsko-Biała, my hometown. I took a long walk around in the morning and I want to share some photos. The Soviet invasion of Poland…

Remembrance through the use of human remains in archaeological collections

Guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum, explores human remains and remembrance in museum collections. Museums and collectors often do not discuss the human remains they care for.  This is due to the complex ethical debates surrounding the excavation, collection and storage of these remains.  In this post, we…

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

Remember Me Research Fellow, Dr Louis Bailey highlights the importance of recognising and confronting discrimination Today (May 17th) marks the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia.  The day raises awareness of the ongoing stigma and discrimination that is directed towards lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex people worldwide, and to highlight the urgent need…

Coffin plates and monuments: comparing 19th century funerary items

During the 19th century inscriptions were used both within the grave and on above ground memorials. Guest-blogger Sarah Hoile, PhD candidate at UCL Institute of Archaeology, is examining the ways these different media were used. On June 18th 1828, John Cotton died in Devonshire Place in Marylebone, London, near Regent’s Park [1]. His body was…

Gordon must fall? The ‘Martyr General’ and Brexit Britain

Guest-blogger James Selway reflects on what the legacy of General Charles Gordon means to him in light of the recent decision by Britain to leave the European Union. If 2016 was a year of political revolt in Britain, 2017 has kick-started a process of reflection across our disunited Kingdom. Critics have labelled Brexit ‘Empire 2.0’,…

The Triumph of the Human Spirit: The Italian Chapel, Orkney

“The chapel is yours to love and preserve” – Signor Chiocchetti (Artist and Italian Prisoner of War, Orkney) Remember Me Researcher, Dr Louis Bailey reports on a unique legacy of World War Two in Orkney. A cold, windswept November morning in 2016 finds me driving over Scapa Flow in Orkney to the site of the…

Why Wear Rosemary on ANZAC Day?

Remember Me Researcher Dr Yvonne Inall explores the reasons underlying the tradition of wearing sprigs of rosemary on Anzac Day. Last year, guest-blogger Dr Jenny McLeod explored the origins of ANZAC Day . This year I want to focus on one of the smaller details of ANZAC Day remembrance activities: the wearing of rosemary. Each…