How would a dementia friendly society memorialise people with dementia?

Guest blogger, Sarah Blair, Administration Manager at Holly Bank Nursing home, ponders the question of how residents with dementia can be remembered and memorialised. I am not a “dementia professional”. I am not a doctor, a nurse or a researcher. I don’t have any qualifications or authority on the subject of dementia, and I have…

A summer internship with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Guest-blogger, Jack Sibley shares his experience as a Centenary Intern with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. This summer I had the fantastic opportunity to move to France for three months in order take part in a new internship programme run by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Living in Arras, the site of a major British…

‘Regards from Hull’ – The texture of remembrance at home and abroad

This Remembrance Day weekend Remember Me Co-Investigator, Dr Nick Evans explores the varied texture of memory and the diversity of the forgotten. On Sunday at 11am Britons at home and in certain parts of the Commonwealth stand to pay homage to the millions of men, women and increasingly animals, who died during the First World…

Stop the presses! Research highlights now available online.

Remember Me Principal Investigator, Emeritus Professor Margaret Holloway heralds the online publication of our first research highlight documents. It’s hard to believe but the ‘Remember Me’ project is well into its final year. The period since my last update has seen all project streams actively engaged in data analysis and report drafting and I am…

Flowers from Freetown

In Freetown Week guest-blogger Gladys Cole shares her experience of creating memorial wreaths for loved ones. Flowers for us Sierra Leoneans are a symbol of love,  hope and sympathy.  We remember our loved ones who have died and honour them by arranging beautiful natural flowers wreaths to lay on their  graves. This is done on…

Making Memorials: behind the scenes at a memorial masons workshop

Remember Me researchers Dr Nick Evans and Dr Yvonne Inall had an opportunity to join a tour of a memorial masons workshop in Hull as part of Heritage Open Days 2017. Stone memorials remain as enduring markers to the departed around the world. Seen as an everlasting memorial, the decisions about what kind of stone,…

Remembering Concepcion Picciotto, Anti-Nuclear Peace Activist

On the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons guest-blogger Lee Karen Stow shares her recollections of meeting and photographing life-long anti-nuclear campaigner Conception Picciotto. Concepcion Picciotto said she spent 35 years of her life outside the White House in Washington DC to “stop the world from being destroyed”. Living in the familiar…

Remembering Bertha Von Suttner on the International Day of Peace

Guest blogger Lee Karen Stow highlights the legacy of Bertha Von Suttner, the first woman awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Prayers and messages of peace hang from the branches of The Peace Tree at The Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, home to the International Court of Justice and the Permanent Court of Arbitration. I…

Words Matter: Trans People, Suicide and ‘Deadnaming’

To mark World Suicide Prevention Day writer Michelle Green shares her thoughts about the recent suicide of a young trans boy, Leo Etherington, who died earlier this year and whose death was recently reported in the media.   This week we heard about the heartbreaking death of Leo Etherington, a young trans lad who committed…

How ‘trinkets’ become family heirlooms.

Guest-blogger, Jasmine Brammer, from Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust in Melbourne, Australia explores the process by which personal objects associated with deceased loved ones become heirlooms. When a loved one dies, their possessions don’t have to be antiques or expensive heirlooms, or itemised in a Will or Trust to gain the title of ‘treasure’. This can…