Remembering Bertha Von Suttner on the International Day of Peace

Guest blogger Lee Karen Stow highlights the legacy of Bertha Von Suttner, the first woman awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Prayers and messages of peace hang from the branches of The Peace Tree at The Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, home to the International Court of Justice and the Permanent Court of Arbitration. I…

Words Matter: Trans People, Suicide and ‘Deadnaming’

To mark World Suicide Prevention Day writer Michelle Green shares her thoughts about the recent suicide of a young trans boy, Leo Etherington, who died earlier this year and whose death was recently reported in the media.   This week we heard about the heartbreaking death of Leo Etherington, a young trans lad who committed…

How ‘trinkets’ become family heirlooms.

Guest-blogger, Jasmine Brammer, from Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust in Melbourne, Australia explores the process by which personal objects associated with deceased loved ones become heirlooms. When a loved one dies, their possessions don’t have to be antiques or expensive heirlooms, or itemised in a Will or Trust to gain the title of ‘treasure’. This can…

The changing face of war memorialisation. Boer War memorials in Hull and Manchester.

Guest-blogger, Megan Howarth, explores the impact of ‘total war’ on memorialisation practices following the Second Boer War. A decade before the First World War permanently changed the way Britain remembered those killed at war, the aftermath of the Second Boer War, the twentieth century’s first ‘Total War’, necessitated the creation of memorials in towns and…

The Bear River Massacre: The West’s Forgotten Past

On the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, guest-blogger Dr Susannah Hopson draws attention to the complex memorial processes associated with the Bear River Massacre. On a warm, bright October day in 2014, I visited the remote town of Franklin, Southeastern Idaho in the United States. An area not usually visited by tourists, this…

Why Remember? Memory and Forgetting in Times of War and its Aftermath 

Remember Me Co-investigator, Dr Michael S. Drake, reports on a recent conference he attended. From 30 June to 2 July 2017, the conference Why Remember? Memory and Forgetting in Times of War and its Aftermath took place in Sarajevo. Organized by Dr Stephenie Young (Salem State University) Dr Paul Lowe (London College of Communication, University…

Remembering Dunkirk

Remember Me Researcher, Dr Yvonne Inall, explores the ways in which the massive evacuation of troops during Operation Dynamo has been memorialised. The release of the new Christopher Nolan film Dunkirk has prompted me to ask the question: how has Dunkirk been memorialised? On 10 May 1940 Germany invaded Belgium and the Netherlands as a…

Remembering Donated Bodies: The Hidden Face of Memorialisation

Guest-blogger Zivarna Murphy offers a glimpse into the process of memorialising those who have gifted their bodies to medical research. When thinking about the changing face of memorialisation in Britain and the increasing emphasis on the individual as the Remember Me Project puts forward, I can’t help but question this when it comes to memorialising…

Mortimer 100: memorialisation through collecting

As part of the 2017 Festival of Archaeology guest blogger, Alice Rose, Documentation Assistant at the Hull and East Riding Museum explores the concept of collections as a form of memorial. Individuals can be memorialised and remembered in a variety of ways.  When we think of memorialisation in the UK, our thoughts usually focus on…

Later Iron Age cremations: interregional practices, local peculiarities

During the Later Iron Age cremation was extremely popular. Guest-blogger Andy Lamb examines this practice. At certain times in European prehistory, new developments arose which were subsequently adopted and adapted across a wide area of the continent. One these was the decision to cremate the dead, which from the 3rd century BC became the preferred…