Making Memorials: behind the scenes at a memorial masons workshop

Remember Me researchers Dr Nick Evans and Dr Yvonne Inall had an opportunity to join a tour of a memorial masons workshop in Hull as part of Heritage Open Days 2017. Stone memorials remain as enduring markers to the departed around the world. Seen as an everlasting memorial, the decisions about what kind of stone,…

Remembering Concepcion Picciotto, Anti-Nuclear Peace Activist

On the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons guest-blogger Lee Karen Stow shares her recollections of meeting and photographing life-long anti-nuclear campaigner Conception Picciotto. Concepcion Picciotto said she spent 35 years of her life outside the White House in Washington DC to “stop the world from being destroyed”. Living in the familiar…

Remembering Bertha Von Suttner on the International Day of Peace

Guest blogger Lee Karen Stow highlights the legacy of Bertha Von Suttner, the first woman awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Prayers and messages of peace hang from the branches of The Peace Tree at The Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands, home to the International Court of Justice and the Permanent Court of Arbitration. I…

Words Matter: Trans People, Suicide and ‘Deadnaming’

To mark World Suicide Prevention Day writer Michelle Green shares her thoughts about the recent suicide of a young trans boy, Leo Etherington, who died earlier this year and whose death was recently reported in the media.   This week we heard about the heartbreaking death of Leo Etherington, a young trans lad who committed…

How ‘trinkets’ become family heirlooms.

Guest-blogger, Jasmine Brammer, from Southern Metropolitan Cemeteries Trust in Melbourne, Australia explores the process by which personal objects associated with deceased loved ones become heirlooms. When a loved one dies, their possessions don’t have to be antiques or expensive heirlooms, or itemised in a Will or Trust to gain the title of ‘treasure’. This can…

The changing face of war memorialisation. Boer War memorials in Hull and Manchester.

Guest-blogger, Megan Howarth, explores the impact of ‘total war’ on memorialisation practices following the Second Boer War. A decade before the First World War permanently changed the way Britain remembered those killed at war, the aftermath of the Second Boer War, the twentieth century’s first ‘Total War’, necessitated the creation of memorials in towns and…

The Bear River Massacre: The West’s Forgotten Past

On the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, guest-blogger Dr Susannah Hopson draws attention to the complex memorial processes associated with the Bear River Massacre. On a warm, bright October day in 2014, I visited the remote town of Franklin, Southeastern Idaho in the United States. An area not usually visited by tourists, this…

Why Remember? Memory and Forgetting in Times of War and its Aftermath 

Remember Me Co-investigator, Dr Michael S. Drake, reports on a recent conference he attended. From 30 June to 2 July 2017, the conference Why Remember? Memory and Forgetting in Times of War and its Aftermath took place in Sarajevo. Organized by Dr Stephenie Young (Salem State University) Dr Paul Lowe (London College of Communication, University…